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  • Obama Claims We Don’t Have A Spending Problem

    Most of the forecasters I subscribe to expect economic growth to average only 1-2% in the first half of 2013. Most believe that 4Q GDP fell sharply from the 3.1% rate in the 3Q of last year, largely due to fears about the fiscal cliff. They also expect growth to improve modestly in the second half of this year to 2% or slightly higher. That’s not too optimistic.

    One reason is that the end of the payroll tax holiday on December 31 means that workers’ pay went down by 2% on January 1, thus adding more headwinds to the economy this year. A person earning $50,000 a year before taxes, for example, will pay an additional $1,000 or more to the government this year.

    Add to that the fact that we are sure to have another nasty debt ceiling battle next month, which will once again be unsettling to consumers who drive the economy. We all remember the fiasco in the summer of 2011 when the Dow plunged over 2,000 points. For these reasons and others, at least the first half of 2013 could be very dicey.

    Actually there are three debt battles – the so called “trifecta” – that lie ahead. In addition to the debt ceiling battle, there is also the sequester/automatic spending cuts on March 1 and the “continuing resolution” to fund the government in the absence of a formal budget passed by Congress. That happens in late March. We will look at all three of these upcoming battles below.

    Today we’ll also touch on the pork-laden fiscal cliff bill that passed on New Year’s Day. And we will ponder the question of whether the US has a “spending problem” or a “taxing problem.” Let’s start with this last one first.

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