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  • U.S. Now World’s Largest Producer of Oil & Gas

    Recent reports have confirmed that the US is now the world’s largest producer of crude oil with output exceeding 11 million barrels per day in the 1Q of this year. This surpasses the daily oil production of Russia and Saudi Arabia. This is the first time in over 40 years that the US has once again become the largest producer of oil in the world – and this is despite the Obama administration’s continued ban on new drilling for oil in our coastal waterways. Oil extraction is soaring at shale formations in Texas and North Dakota as companies split rock formations believed to contain oil using high-pressure liquids, a process known as hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking.” This oil boom has dramatically lowered petroleum imports into America. The share of US fuel consumption met by imports is down from 60% in 2005 to 33% in 2013 and is expected to fall to 22% in 2015, which would be the lowest since 1970. I will discuss the latest good news in detail as we go along today.

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  • Some Scary Bumps in the Road Just Ahead

    The major stock indexes moved lower after setting new record highs in early August, although prices have recovered somewhat in the last few days. So was the weakness in August just an overdue correction before moving even higher? Maybe, but there are a number of things coming up in the next month or so that could rattle the markets even more, including whether or not we go to war with Syria.

    Clearly, the stock and bond markets continue to be nervous about the Fed cutting back on its QE bond and mortgage purchases, perhaps as soon as the Fed’s next policy meeting that ends on September 18. There is also some anxiety about who will be the next Fed chairman (or woman).

    Yet there are other upcoming concerns that the markets seem to be worried about, as well they should. Certainly, the continued rise in interest rates is a serious issue for the markets and the economy. The yield on 10-year Treasury notes has soared from 1.6% back in May to near 3%. Long bond yields are nearing 4%. Investors don’t know what lies ahead.

    The markets are also starting to factor in the looming battle in Washington over the federal budget for FY2014, which begins on October 1. President Obama vows he won’t negotiate this time around. Also, there is another battle over the debt ceiling coming by mid-October and yet another threat of a government shutdown.

    We'll look into all of these issues today and how they may affect the markets.

    But before we get into those issues, let’s examine last Friday’s jobs report for August. The White House and the media hailed it as a success since the headline unemployment rate fell from 7.4% to 7.3%. What they failed to point out was the decline occurred because a lot more folks dropped out of the labor market. Truth is, the report was once again a disappointment.

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  • How Syria Could Spark New Middle East War

    What does the stand-off in Syria have to do with the investment markets? Potentially, a lot. As I have argued in recent weeks, if the Middle East devolves into another military quagmire, it could be quite bearish for the US stock and bond markets going forward. That’s why we will talk about the implications today.

    President Obama is hell-bent on attacking Syria for gassing over 1,400 innocent citizens on August 21. Normally, it would not be unusual for an American president to want to respond to such a humanitarian outrage. But it is still not clear why this liberal president – who’s mandate was to get us out of war – is now so intent that we need to attack Syria militarily.

    We begin our analysis today by briefly examining how the civil war in Syria began and why. From there, we examine whether the US has any justified reasons to get involved or to punish Syria’s president Bashar al-Assad for the recent chemical attacks on his own people. For whatever reasons, President Obama initially felt that he alone had the authority to take the US to war with Syria, and made plans to do so last week.

    However, an NBC poll released last Friday revealed that almost 80% of Americans believe that the president must get congressional approval before taking the nation to war. Other polls showed that a majority of Americans don’t want the US to attack Syria, period. So on Saturday, Obama backed down and said he would wait for Congress to have its say next week.

    But before we get to that discussion, let’s take a quick look at the latest economic reports, including last Thursday’s 2Q GDP estimate, which was revised up from 1.7% to a more healthy 2.5%, and a few other recent reports. Let’s get started.

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  • Should The US Negotiate With Iran On Iraq?

    Introduction US & Iran Finally Open Talks On Iraq The war in Iraq has gone dreadfully wrong. We all (liberals and conservatives) know that. The Bush administration was clearly unprepared for the Jihadist war and the sectarian violence that would follow...